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Can Top Gear America Save Rally Racing?

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Rally racing is the most dynamic motorsport on earth—or at least it used to be. From the 1970s to the late 1990s, rally racing did wear that crown and rally cars were some of the most coveted vehicular icons of their time. The sport birthed world-renowned stars in both driver and vehicle, like Colin McRae and the Subaru WRX STI. But recent years have not been kind to the sport of rally racing and it is in need of a facelift. The Top Gear America hosts think they have that all figured out.

The Heroes of Rally Racing

Rally drivers are some of the best race car pilots in the world. The constant variations in terrain and traction combined with open-stage course conditions that can change in seconds forces them to develop god-like levels of control and finess. It’s no wonder legends like Walter Rohrl and Sebasian Loeb crossed over into road racing with great success. Rally racing has produced (or attracted) some of Formula 1’s greatest drivers like Alain Prost and Kimi Raikkonen, too. Even modern legends, like Ken Block and Travis Pastrana, regularly demonstrate that they can hold their own on tarmac with the best.

The drivers aren’t the only heroes. Cars like the Lancia Stratos were hyper-exotic poster art akin to Ferrari and Lamborghini and just happened to be extremely capable race cars; winning races and stages for years on an out-dated two-wheel drive chassis when the dominators of the sport had long switched to four-wheel drive.

But it wasn’t just the country club and yacht crowd that could attain a world-class rally car. Group B rally racing turned everyday appliances into legends. Cars the Fords Escort, Focus and Fiesta, the Toyota Celica, Subaru Impreza and Mitsubishi Lancer were all boy-racer dream cars that the average weekend warrior could attain. Ever wonder why WRXs and Evos were so popular in the 1990s? Win on Sunday, sell on Monday and boy did those cars do lots of winning.

Fundamental Flaws of Rally Racing

Rally racing, today, is not what it was 20 years ago. Only three manufacturers competed in the 2020 World Rally Championship (WRC) when dozens used to compete. Fan participation has dropped, tv coverage and viewership has dropped, but the Top Gear America hosts know how to fix it. The way they see it, rally racing is facing five fundamental flaws that they’re going to address in only the way Top Gear America can.

The Cars—Modern rally cars are cool and fast as all get out but they’re all based on boring subcompact cars that no one likes. If you went to high school between 1995 and 2005, you probably wanted a Subaru or Mitsubishi as your first car and it was because of rally racing. What car inspires the youth of today to get out and drive, the Ford Fiesta? Ford doesn’t even make it any more!

No, rally racing needs vehicular heroes that bring variety back to the sport and can capture the hearts of the youth. Jethro is kicking it old-school in his 2020 Subaru WRX STI Series White, figuring this more-street tuned evolution of Subaru’s indomitable rally car still has the right DNA.

Dax has gone for more of a sleeper approach with the 2020 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400. A sporty sedan in a rally race? Don’t worry kids, Dax hasn’t lost his mind. The Q50 Red Sport has 400hp and all-wheel drive, plus it comes from the same engineering geniuses that created Rob’s ride—the 2020 Nissan GT-R Track Edition—which does not belong off-road at all. But Rob thinks it will be a blast anyway with it’s 600 Tokyo-destroying horsepower.

The Drivers—Modern rally car drivers are just too dang good! How is the average weekend warrior supposed to keep up with Tanner Foust on a local race-weekend? They can’t! So the guys want to attempt to level the playing field and give everyone an equal shot at victory. Remember, Jethro is a real professional race car driver—Rob doesn’t have a hope in matching him for skill. But at the same time he has almost double the power in the GT-R as Jethro does in the Subaru. Time to break out the handicaps!

Audience Participation—The best part of motorport for the spectator is being there; feeling the exhaust pressure hit you as the cars race by, the wall of sound vibrating you to the core and the smell of hydrocarbons littering the atmosphere. Rally racing fans are some of the most dedicated to getting as close to the action as possible, often risking life and limb to get the best view. So how can our brave hosts get the people closer to the action without risking their safety? This one might need to be workshopped a while longer…

The Look—A modern WRC car looks like the technological marvel it is—and usually technological marvels are expensive. At around $750,000, a WRC race car doesn’t miss that mark. To get more people involved in rally racing, the barrier to entry needs to be lowered so that the amature racer isn’t priced out, but the cars still have to look cool.

Jethro has gone for a clean set of graphics, a la Colin McRae and his 555 liveries. Dax has gone for more utility and ruggedness by cutting his fenders and lifting the Infiniti. The light bar adds a mean look, too. Rob just went for off-the-wall-style points—no rear bumper, side pipes and truck-bed liner to armor the fenders. The guys definitely present a diverse cast of eye-catching characters here.

The Event—Rally race events themselves need the most help. The same stages get run year after year, cars are released one at a time to prevent everyone’s favorite part of motorsport—the crashes—and co-drivers are so good with the notes that even if a driver is unfamiliar with the terrain, they can confidently charge forward. It’s time to flip that on its head! No more co-drivers, no more well-known stages and tracks and give us that wheel-to-wheel action! What could go wrong?

This isn’t the end of Top Gear America for this season. The action all comes back starting May 7th, 2021, only on the MotorTrend App. Don’t worry, there’s plenty to watch in the meantime, like seasons 1-27 of BBC’s Top Gear, Roadkill, Fastest Cars in the Dirty South or Dirt Every Day. Plus, there’s no better time to binge the first half of this season of Top Gear America than right after watching the midseason finale.

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Tesla Kicking Inattentive Drivers Off “Full Self Driving” Beta Testing

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  3. Tesla Kicking Inattentive Drivers Off “Full Self Driving” Beta Testing

Excited for Full Self Driving Beta software? Better pay attention to the road.

On March 6, Elon Musk tweeted about adding a “Download Beta” on-screen button to Tesla cars’ touchscreens “in 10 days.” While the button is stuck in limbo on the flow of EMT (Elon’s Master Time), the Tesla CEO also disclosed that the next big software release for the automaker’s vehicles will be in April, so we can at least expect the expanded availability of FSD beta software beyond today’s select group of owner-testers and some employees.

The forthcoming “Download beta” option for all is huge news. Customers who paid thousands of dollars for the FSD sensor hardware necessary to support fully automated driving (and the promise of later fully autonomous travel activated by software update), they can now try out a skeletal outline of that capability in “beta,” or incomplete test form. (The system can guide so-equipped Teslas along a navigation route, making lane changes, make full right and left turns, and heed traffic signals.) Those same eager Teslarati should take note: It’s not all hands-free, kick-back-and-let-the-car-do-the-work from here on out, and they can lose their FSD preview if they aren’t careful.

How? Well, Mr. Musk has revealed that some drivers had their FSD beta access removed because they were not paying sufficient attention to the road with the system engaged.

How did Tesla determine who was being naughty? Already, every Tesla equipped with the Level 2 Autopilot driver assist regularly detects force applied to the steering wheel—so as to shut Autopilot off if a driver fails to make an input at the wheel every so often (a de-facto “check-in”). On recent models, the in-cabin camera can keep tabs on things; for a time, this camera was simply disabled. But recently, Tesla has started using the in-car camera for driver attention monitoring, as an additional way to combat misuse of Autopilot, which is not intended to be a hands- and attention-free system. Again, it’s only a Level 2 semi-autonomous setup, capable of accelerating, braking, and steering in certain closed environments such as freeways.

It seems that, so far, being kicked out of FSD beta testing requires being spotted not spotting the road ahead by this in-car camera, as well as the typical steering-input tracking Tesla has long employed.

Tesla hacker “green”, @greentheonly, was able to gather footage from the cabin camera (which is mounted right below the rear-view mirror) and figured out what aspects the computer is detecting for driver monitoring. The system is mostly tracking head, eyes, and sunglasses. Interestingly, it is also trying to detect “phone use,” keeping a virtual eye out for drivers holding and looking at a phone, which is a common cause of distracted driving. The percentage read-outs in the video represent the system’s “confidence level.” As Tesla is famously known for using AI for image recognition. In this case, the higher the percentage, the more likely it is the case that the driver is using a phone. The hacker also tried to place physical photo print outs (including a photo of Elon Musk) in various locations to trick the system. And yes, it can be tricked. It is an interesting video, take a look in the YouTube clip below:

Obviously, the system is still in its infancy and in development. At this point, Tesla has three ways to detect a driver’s attention level: Steering force, the seat sensor, and the in-cabin camera.

Autonomous driving—and where responsibility lies in case of an accident—is an extremely difficult problem to work out. The road to fully autonomous driving, Full Self Driving or otherwise, is very long but technology likely will get there. Tesla is definitely pushing the boundaries of testing such setups by releasing an “autonomous-adjacent” feature to the public and gathering data on their use of the system. But it cannot be stressed enough: No matter the FSD system’s capability, it requires an attentive pilot to monitor whether the system is actually doing its job. This is why tech companies and other automakers pay trained individuals to keep tabs on self-driving prototype cars and be ready to jump in and take control if a situation warrants them doing so.

So, a reminder, Tesla owners. FSD is merely in limited-capability beta form, and Autopilot is anything but what its name implies. Both setups can make stupid decisions and still require the driver’s attention to take control for many situations. All of which is to say: Tesla owners, when the “Download FSD Beta” button finally appears on your EV’s touchscreen, please use it responsibly and operate the vehicle safely, keeping your eyes on the road. Tesla is watching.

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Success of Mustang and Bronco Sub-Brands Means More Spin-Offs to Come

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Ford CEO Jim Farley was a champion of the idea of creating sub-brands around iconic Blue Oval nameplates, starting with Mustang and Bronco. With those models’ early success seeing their names spread beyond their core original Mustang and Bronco models, Farley thinks there is room to expand the concept to more nameplates.

“We have so much opportunity,” Farley tells MotorTrend in an interview. “We have such a plethora of ideas and passion brands in the company. So many in Europe and in the U.S. We run deep. So, I don’t think we’re going to stop there.”

The sub-brand idea goes back to the naming of Ford’s first performance all-electric, battery-powered SUV, the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E. The move rankled some purists who felt that all the Mustang styling cues in the world, not to mention 480 horsepower and 634 lb-ft of instant torque were not enough to justify attaching the Mustang pony car nameplate to a four-door crossover. The Mach-E represents the first expansion of the Mustang family in 55 years, meaning it also risks messing with the muscle car’s history and legacy and all those other sacred realms that can easily kill a bold idea.

How an Electric SUV Became a Mustang

Ford had begun work on a “compliance” electric vehicle, so-named because it was being developed to meet emissions standards and nothing more. The milquetoast crossover, based on the Ford Fusion, was scrapped under then-new CEO Jim Hackett, but it was his lieutenant Jim Farley who challenged the team to use the Mustang as inspiration for a sportier and more exciting design and the dynamism a rear-drive platform could inject. Somewhere along the development line, the vehicle went from Mustang-inspired to a full-on Mustang, having been deemed worthy of the pony badge.

Any fan-base vitriol is being overshadowed by critical acclaim for the Mach-E. Those who have driven one don’t care what it is called if it performs as promised. MotorTrend testers were impressed with the Mach-E’s balance and found it to be a whole lot of fun. Ford sold more than 6,600 Mach-E SUVs in the U.S. in the first quarter.

Bronco Becomes Sub-Brand

Creating an outdoorsy sub-brand around the Bronco name has been less controversial, but arguably more confusing. That is because the return of the Ford Ranger pickup-based, body-on-frame Bronco in two-and four-door configurations, is still a way out. The 2021 Bronco is not due until fall and some models have been delayed to the 2022 model year due to supply-chain issues.

Despite the delays, “we have almost 200,000 reservations for Bronco,” Farley says. “If they all convert to orders, that’s two years of production.”

Meanwhile, a new unibody SUV, sharing front-drive underpinnings with the Ford Escape but with more off-road capability and the squared-off, rugged look of a Bronco, is the first family member on the market. The 2021 Bronco Sport is on sale now—and more than 23,000 of them sold in the U.S. in the first quarter—and comes with a surprising amount of capability. A hallmark of the new Bronco brand is standard all-wheel drive.

“I’m so glad we allocated that capital to that Bronco lineup,” Farley says.

An entry-level compact pickup could join the Bronco brand, as well. It is expected to use the front-wheel drive platform used by the Ford Focus in Europe, and the new pickup—”Maverick” seems to be the leading name, but perhaps “Bronco Courier” could work—would slot below the Ranger.

More Sub-Brands to Come

The success of Mustang and Bronco spin-offs are encouraging Ford to continue down this path of putting variants and even different body styles under the umbrella of a single nameplate. “I made it very clear when we rolled out the plan that we’re going to create new passion brands too,” Farley says.

It makes marketing sense; building awareness for a new nameplate requires a lot of time and money. Tapping into a legacy name comes with recognition. Mustang has been mentioned in at least 50 songs; Bronco has been featured in more than 1,200 films, 200 songs, and one very famous police chase by a former running back.

The CEO does not go on to say which nameplates could evolve into sub-brands. We can hazard a few guesses. In Europe, where Ford continues to sell cars beyond the Mustang, the real emphasis is on commercial vehicles. Ford is betting heavily on returns from its commercial vehicles making Transit a good bet.

Then there is the Ford F-150. Ford lumps the light-duty pickup with heavy duties under the umbrella of F-Series—a category that collectively sells about 1.1 million trucks a year. But F-Series as a name has not really struck gold in the automotive lexicon the way F-150 has. There are so many trims and special editions that F-150 is arguably already a sub-brand (it’s a common refrain that Ford’s F-150 business alone could make up its own Fortune 500 company). And there is more to come, as Ford plans an all-electric F-150 next year, part of a larger plan to electrify its iconic vehicles.

Raptor Would Also Be a Good Sub-Brand for Ford

And with Ford promising a real acceleration in the number of nameplates still to come, including many new electric vehicles, there are likely sub-brands in the works for names we have not yet heard of. That includes plans for small electric vehicles for Europe using partner Volkswagen’s MEB electric vehicle platform.

“We’re going to grow as a company,” Farley says. “There’s no shortage of great ideas.”

So, to end on a touchy subject … Which does Farley prefer: a Mustang or a Mustang Mach-E? “I want both,” he tells us. “I want both because I have the luxury of having more than one vehicle in my household. And yeah. I want a Mustang for the Dream Cruise and I want my Mustang Mach-E, GT specifically, to drive to work every day, and once in a while, maybe a Bronco. And if I want to go up north on a nice summer weekend, I’ll probably take my Mustang. It depends on the trip.”

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2021 Toyota Highlander XLE vs. Highlander XSE: The Battle for the High Land

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  6. 2021 Toyota Highlander XLE vs. Highlander XSE: The Battle for the High Land

Is the XSE really that sporty? We drove both back-to-back.

Toyota Highlander Full Overview

The Toyota Highlander is known for being a reliable, good-looking three-row SUV, but among the list of adjectives used to describe it, sporty is not on our list. New for 2021 is the Highlander XSE, which swaps its elegant lines for a more dynamic appearance. With a unique grille, fascia, lower spoiler, wheels, and blackened details like the mirror caps and fake air vents, the XSE distinguishes itself from the rest of the Highlander lineup. But the XSE is more than a badge and an appearance package—Toyota engineers made changes under the skin to deliver a more connected driving experience. Among those trades are stiffer spring rates, a thicker anti-roll bar, and retuned shock absorbers, while the steering feel is more pronounced.

Earlier this year we tested a 2021 Highlander XSE but couldn’t notice any major differences between the regular three-row SUV and the new trim. To get a better perspective, we asked Toyota to lend us the XSE back along with an XLE—the most popular Highlander trim—for a back-to-back comparison.

How Sporty is Sporty?

Usually, we associate the word sporty with extra power and dynamic handling, but that’s not the case here. All Highlanders—regardless of the trim—are powered by a 295-hp, 263 lb-ft 3.5-liter V-6 mated to an eight-speed transmission. Our XSE and XLE both came with the optional all-wheel drive system, which can send up to 50 percent of the torque to the rear wheels. Besides the suspension and steering settings, the XSE comes with stickier tires and 20-inch wheels (instead of 18s).

Driving the Highlanders back-to-back exposed the difference we didn’t see earlier in the year. Compared to the XLE, the XSE’s steering felt a bit more weighted, but short of what we’d describe as sporty. The difference was like turning Sport mode on—the XSE felt more alert while the XLE seemed to be in comfort mode all the time. The response was a bit sharper and better balanced and provided a tad more feedback than the XLE. Still, it wasn’t a night and day difference, as the XSE’s steering is still tuned to on the comfort side of the spectrum.

The case is the same with the ride. On our test loop that mingles through curvy roads, broken pavement and highway portions, the Highlander XSE’s body felt a bit more controlled than the XLE. On the broken pavement, the XSE’s suspension felt like it was tuned to work in a one-and-done fashion versus trying to dissipate the vibrations in the cabin in a cushier way, like we felt in the XLE. On twisty roads, the XSE felt sharper, more controlled and a tad grippier—the latter mostly because of the Goodyear Eagle Touring tires compared to the XLE’s Michelin Premier LTX. Ride quality wasn’t impacted by the XSE’s bigger wheels.

At our track in Fontana, California, the pair felt pretty close to each other in our acceleration and handling tests. In the 0-60 mph run and the quarter mile, the XLE was 0.1 second faster, but on our braking test the XSE’s tires showed off, stopping in 116 ft compared to 122 ft for the XLE. “Similar feel to the XLE: Lots of front dive, softly sprung front suspension,” said associate road test editor Erick Ayapana after driving them back-to-back.

Things were minimally different on the skid pad as well, where road test editor Chris Walton managed to shave 0.2 second in the XSE for a time of 26.5-seconds at 0.65 g (the XLE took 26.7 seconds at 0.64 g). “Lots of body roll in the corners, and the steering seems heavy for heavy’s sake. The transmission wasn’t very intelligent on the skid pad, so I had to downshift manually,” said Walton on the XLE. His feelings were almost replicated in the XSE, noting the same foibles as in the XLE but less so. “There’s still quite a lot of dive and roll, but not as severe. The transmission behaves the same, and perhaps the tires are a little sportier, so it was easier to brake in the same spot consistently,” he added.

So, how sporty is sporty? The Highlander XSE falls short of what we’d call sporty or spirited. But like Walton said after driving the XSE on the skid pad, “this is how the regular Highlander should be.” The stiffer springs and weighted steering help it keep its body under control when driving aggressively, and still have that level of comfort that the three-row Toyota is known for.

Are the Interiors Different?

Similar to the exterior, the cabins are a bit different. The biggest change is the red leatherette in the XSE, which you can choose at no cost. (On a side note, the red leatherette only covers the first and second rows; the third row gets black seats.) If you prefer something more traditional, black leatherette seats are also standard, which is how our model came equipped. Faux carbon-fiber trim can be seen across the dashboard. The XLE, on the other hand, trades the red leatherette for a premium appeal, especially with the Harvest Beige interior, which combines beige and brown materials. And instead of getting the fake carbon-fiber, the XLE gets a shiny gray plastic.

The other minor difference inside is the design of the Multi-Terrain selector, which is controlled by a knob in the XSE instead of buttons like in the XLE. Both SUVs have the same three modes—Mud & Sand, Normal, and Rock & Dirt—only the way to select them is different.

Opting for the XLE allows you to choose between a seven- or eight-passenger interior at no cost; the XSE arrives with seven seats only.

Everything else is the same across the board. Both SUVs come with five USB ports (three in the front row, two in the second row) and an 8.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The XSE is available with navigation and a JBL premium audio system (a $1,680 option), while the XLE offers navigation and a premium audio option (no JBL speakers) for $1,040. Both systems sounded good; we didn’t notice any major difference between them.

Interior space is the same in both Highlanders, with the third row feeling cramped for adults. Recently, Toyota trademarked the “Grand Highlander” name, which means we might see a bigger three-row SUV soon, which could amplify interior space.

Which Highlander Should I Buy?

The XSE is positioned between the XLE and Limited grades, which means it starts at $42,680 while the XLE is priced at $41,085. All-wheel drive is an extra $1,950 for either model. Our XLE, which only added the navigation and audio package, crossed the checkout counter at $43,625. Our XSE added the JBL package and other accessories like the cargo cross bars on the roof, all-weather floor mats, and illuminated door sills (among others) that increased its price to $47,451.

In the end, it all comes down to the looks and practicality. If you think the Highlander’s design is boring, the XSE definitely brings more emotion. But if your budget is tighter, the XLE is a good option. The stiffer suspension and steering settings likely won’t affect your decision, as the experience behind the wheel is virtually the same when either Highlander is not pushed to its limits, something the vast majority of owners will stay away from.

If it were our money, we’d probably go with the XSE, as we prefer its handling on the road and its stickier tires. We’d rather have the XLE’s exterior design, but we’d get the red leatherette seats if we were buying the XSE. We can’t have the best of both worlds here, but we’re glad Toyota is giving customers more options to choose from.

Looks good! More details?

POWERTRAIN/CHASSIS 2021 Toyota Highlander XLE AWD 2021 Toyota Highlander XSE AWD
DRIVETRAIN LAYOUT Front-engine, AWD
ENGINE TYPE Atkinson-cycle 60-deg V-6, alum block/heads
VALVETRAIN DOHC, 4 valves/cyl
DISPLACEMENT 210.9 cu in/3,456 cc
COMPRESSION RATIO 11.8:1
POWER (SAE NET) 295 hp @ 6,600 rpm
TORQUE (SAE NET) 263 lb-ft @ 4,700 rpm
REDLINE 6,750 rpm
WEIGHT TO POWER 14.7 lb/hp 14.9 lb/hp
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
AXLE/FINAL-DRIVE RATIO 3.00:1/2.02:1
SUSPENSION, FRONT; REAR Struts, coil springs, anti-roll bar; multilink, coil springs, anti-roll bar
STEERING RATIO 14.2:1
TURNS LOCK-TO-LOCK 2.8
BRAKES, F; R 13.3-in vented disc; 13.3-in disc, ABS
WHEELS 8.0 x 18-in cast aluminum 8.0 x 20-in cast aluminum
TIRES 235/65R18 106V Michelin Premier LTX (M+S) 235/55R20 102V Goodyear Eagle Touring (M+S)
DIMENSIONS
WHEELBASE 112.2 in
TRACK, F/R 65.3/65.4 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 194.9 x 76.0 x 68.1 in
GROUND CLEARANCE 8.0 in
APPRCH/DEPART ANGLE 17.9/23.0 deg
TURNING CIRCLE 37.4 ft
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,341 lb (56/44%) 4,394 lb (55/45%)
TOWING CAPACITY 5,000 lb
SEATING CAPACITY 7 6
HEADROOM, F/M/R 38.4/39.4/36.1 in
LEGROOM, F/M/R 40.4/41.0/27.7 in
SHOULDER ROOM, F/M/R 59.0/58.7/55.0 in
CARGO VOLUME, BEH F/M/R 84.3/48.4/16.0 cu ft
TEST DATA
ACCELERATION TO MPH
0-30 2.4 sec 2.4 sec
0-40 3.8 3.9
0-50 5.2 5.4
0-60 6.8 6.9
0-70 9.2 9.4
0-80 11.6 12.0
0-90 14.3 14.6
PASSING, 45-65 MPH 3.5 3.6
QUARTER MILE 15.3 sec @ 92.8 mph 15.4 sec @ 92.6 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 122 ft 116 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.82 g (avg) 0.86 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 26.7 sec @ 0.64 g (avg) 26.5 sec @ 0.65 g (avg)
TOP-GEAR REVS @ 60 MPH 1,500 rpm
CONSUMER INFO
BASE PRICE $42,860 $44,805
PRICE AS TESTED $43,900 $47,726
AIRBAGS 8: Dual front, front side, driver knee, front-pass thigh, f/m/r curtain
BASIC WARRANTY 3 yrs/36,000 miles
POWERTRAIN WARRANTY 5 yrs/60,000 miles
ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE 2 yrs/25,000 miles
FUEL CAPACITY 17.9 gal
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB ECON 20/27/23 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 169/125 kWh/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.86 lb/mile
RECOMMENDED FUEL Unleaded regular

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