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YouTube is trying something new with dislikes. 


James Martin/CNET

YouTube on Tuesday said it’s testing new designs that hide the number of dislikes on a video from public view. People in the test group will start seeing the new designs in the coming weeks, the company said.

“In response to creator feedback around well-being and targeted dislike campaigns, we’re testing a few new designs that don’t show the public dislike count,” YouTube said in a tweet. “If you’re part of this small experiment, you might spot one of these designs in the coming weeks (example below!).”

👍👎 In response to creator feedback around well-being and targeted dislike campaigns, we’re testing a few new designs that don’t show the public dislike count. If you’re part of this small experiment, you might spot one of these designs in the coming weeks (example below!). pic.twitter.com/aemrIcnrbx

— YouTube (@YouTube) March 30, 2021

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Creators will still be able to see how many likes and dislikes their content receives in YouTube Studio. Viewers who are part of the test will also still be able to like or dislike videos “to share feedback with creators and help tune the recommendations you see on YouTube,” the company tweeted

Already, people on Twitter have responded to the company’s post to criticize the move. 

“What about content that is objectively bad and harmful to people? Like scams etc?” one tweet reads

“You are actually promoting bad content by hiding dislikes,” another person tweeted. “That’s what partially keeps people accountable and let’s [sic] other viewers know if something is worth watching.”

Another tweet reads: “the problem with websites that don’t have dislike buttons is it’s harder for people to get an idea of what’s good and what’s bad. like if twitter had a dislike button, you guys could see how much everybody hates this.”

A handful of social media companies have recently made changes which they say are part of an effort to tackle harassment. In 2019, Facebook and Instagram began experimenting with hiding likes among some users. Instagram also nixed its Following tab, which showed which posts and accounts people were engaging with. Still, some experts have been skeptical of Big Tech’s motivations, saying those moves could be a matter of risk mitigation in the face of intense scrutiny. Social media companies have long been criticized for being addictiveharboring harmful content and fostering anxiety and depression, particularly among younger audiences.

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Walmart gives workers off on Thanksgiving.

Walmart workers won’t have to work this Thanksgiving..


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Black Friday deals aren’t limited to just the Friday after Thanksgiving. Retailers start their sales on Thanksgiving, but this year, it’ll be different at Walmart

The retail giant said Friday it’s giving workers the day off on Thanksgiving due to their work during the pandemic. It joins Target, which said in January it wouldn’t be open on Thanksgiving

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“Closing its stores on Thanksgiving Day is an additional way the retailer is thanking associates for their dedication to serving customers and their perseverance throughout the pandemic,” the company said in a press release Friday. 

Walmart also closed its stores on Thanksgiving last year due to the pandemic. 

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Apple reports improved behavior in its supplier chain.


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Apple reported improvements in its manufacturing partners’ operational conduct in 2020 while grappling with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Apple’s annual supply-chain responsibility report for 2021 focuses on a range of topics, including labor and human rights, worker health and safety, and the environment, among other things.  

Apple reported a reduction in major violations of its Code of Conduct among its suppliers and didn’t mention discovering any cases of child labor. It also found no instances of forced labor. Most of the violations Apple reported related to violations of the company’s working-hours policy or labor data falsification.

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During the year, Apple conducted 1,121 supplier assessments in 53 countries to ensure compliance with the company’s Code of Conduct. The company also said it conducted 57,618 interviews with supply chain workers to ensure those workers participating in the assessment process weren’t retaliated against.

While Apple’s 113-page report (PDF) didn’t mention uncovering child labor being employed in suppliers’ facilities, the company did find that one facility had “misclassified the student workers in their program and falsified paperwork to disguise violations of our Code, including allowing students to work nights and/or overtime, and in some cases, to perform work unrelated to their major.” Apple said it placed the supplier on probation and stopped doing business with the facility until the issue was corrected.

The report didn’t identify the supplier that was suspended, but in November, Apple reportedly froze any new business contracts with Pegatron, one of its key suppliers, after the Taiwanese company was found to be breaking the company’s supply chain rules by falsifying paperwork and misclassifying workers in order to cover up labor violations.

Apple found a major reduction in violations of its code of conduct in 2020, reporting nine during the year compared with 17 the year earlier and 48 in 2017. Seven of the nine cases in 2020 related to working hours or labor data falsification. Overall, the company reported 93% compliance with its working-hours rules, which require suppliers to restrict work weeks to 60 hours.

Apple also said it rejected 8% of prospective suppliers for code-related risks.

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Boeing

The Boeing Company reached an agreement with the US Federal Aviation Administration on Thursday that requires it to pay at least $17 million in penalties, after the Chicago-based manufacturer installed equipment with unapproved sensors in hundreds of 737 Max and NG aircraft.

“Keeping the flying public safe is our primary responsibility,” said FAA Administrator Steve Dickson. “That is not negotiable, and the FAA will hold Boeing and the aviation industry accountable to keep our skies safe.”

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The settlement comes as the FAA seeks to step up its scrutiny of airline production and safety. In February, the Department of Transportation’s inspector general’s office said the FAA needed to strengthen its aircraft review process and issued a 55-page report detailing how the agency had misunderstood the 737 Max’s MCAS flight control system. Though not related to today’s settlement, that system was ultimately blamed for two crashes that, combined, killed 346 people.

In addition to the penalties, Boeing has agreed to take a number of corrective actions, including measures meant to ensure future compliance with FAA regulations and to reduce the chance that Boeing again submits aircraft with nonconforming parts for airworthiness certification. If Boeing fails to comply within 30 days, the FAA will direct the company to pay up to $10.1 million in additional penalties.

“We take our responsibility to meet all regulatory requirements very seriously,” a Boeing spokesperson told CNET. “These penalties stem from issues that were raised in 2019 and which we fully resolved in our production system and supply chain. We continue to devote time and resources to improving safety and quality performance across our operations. This includes ensuring that our teammates understand all requirements and comply with them in every way.”

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